Cramond_Island_from_air

Cramond Island is a tidal island about one mile (1.6 km) out to sea. The island has served several purposes in it’s history. It is believed that Romans first constructed a defence on the island for their harbor at Cramond. In the 1800s the Island was mainly used to graze sheep’s. There also used to be a farmstead on the island which was later used as a holiday home. During both the first world war and the second world war the island was used to defend the Firth of Forth. Most of the structures dating from the second world war still remain on the island today.


Cramond Island is connected to the mainland at low tide across the Drum Sands. A paved path, exposed at low tide, allows easy access. This causeway runs at the foot of a row of concrete pylons on one side of the causeway, which were constructed as a submarine defence boom during the Second World War and are one of the most striking sights in the area. At high tide the path is covered by several feet of seawater which cuts the island off from the mainland. It is safe to walk along the raised causeway to the island at low tide, but only if visitors ensure that they leave enough time to return to the mainland before the water rises.

The actual tide times can be found on the website of the NTSLF. Just before you enter the causeway you will find a sign with the current tide times, so make sure you double check if you have enough time to return!


If you still have time (and energy) after the visit to Cramond island, then you can follow the River Almond towards Queensferry road, around the River Almond is a beautiful forest and several waterfalls and bridges.

To reach Cramond just take bus 41 towards Cramond on Princes street, from the bus stop (A on the map below)it’s a small walk to the water side. You can take bus 41 back to Princes street from the same location. If you do the walk along the river then you will find a bus stop at “B” on the map below.